News

PTSD ‘at crisis levels’ among police officers
Media Article

May 9, 2019 | via BBC News

Kids Can Get ‘Stuck’ on Traumatic Event, Leading to PTSD
Media Article

March 28, 2019 | via US News & World Report

‘The invisible folks’: Spouses behind vets with PTSD
Media Article

March 13, 2019 | via NBC News

Mental Health Treatment Delay: A Comparison Among Civilians and Veterans of Different Service Eras
Research Article

Goldberg, S.B., Simpson, T.L., et al. (2019)
Psychiatry Online (e-pub).

Abstract
Objective: The study compared delay of treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, and alcohol use disorder among post-9/11 veterans versus pre-9/11 veterans and civilians. Methods: The 2012–2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III (NESARC-III), a nationally representative survey of U.S. noninstitutionalized adults, was used. Participants included 13,528 civilians, 1,130 pre-9/11 veterans, and 258 post-9/11 veterans with lifetime diagnoses of PTSD, major depression, or alcohol use disorder. Cox proportional hazard models, controlling for relevant demographic characteristics, were used to estimate differences in treatment delay (i.e., time between diagnosis and treatment). Results: Post-9/11 veterans were less likely to delay treatment for PTSD and depression than pre-9/11 veterans (adjusted hazard ratios [AHRs]=0.69 and 0.74, respectively) and civilians (AHRs=0.60 and 0.67, respectively). No differences in treatment delay were observed between post-9/11 veterans and pre-9/11 veterans or civilians for alcohol use disorder. In an exploratory analysis, post-9/11 veterans with past-year military health care coverage (e.g., Veterans Health Administration) had shorter delays for depression treatment compared with post-9/11 veterans without military coverage, pre-9/11 veterans regardless of health care coverage, and civilians, although past-year coverage did not predict treatment delay for PTSD or alcohol use disorder. Conclusions: Post-9/11 veterans were less likely to delay treatment for some common psychiatric conditions compared with pre-9/11 veterans or civilians, which may reflect efforts to engage recent veterans in mental health care. All groups exhibited low initiation of treatment for alcohol use disorder, highlighting the need for further engagement efforts.
The parking lot suicides
Media Article

February 7th, 2019 | via The Washington Post

Mental Health And Terrorism: What Are The Links?
Media Article

January 3rd, 2019 | via Forbes

Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depression in Civilian Patients After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury A TRACK-TBI Study
Research Article

Stein, M.E., Jain, S., Giacino, J.T., et al. (2019)
JAMA Psychiatry (e-pub).

Abstract
Importance: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with adverse mental health outcomes, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), but little is known about factors that modify risk for these psychiatric sequelae, particularly in the civilian sector. Objective: To ascertain prevalence of and risk factors for PTSD and MDD among patients evaluated in the emergency department for mild TBI (mTBI). Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective longitudinal cohort study (February 2014 to May 2018). Posttraumatic stress disorder and MDD symptoms were assessed using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item. Risk factors evaluated included preinjury and injury characteristics. Propensity score weights-adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were performed to assess associations with PTSD and MDD. A total of 1155 patients with mTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score, 13-15) and 230 patients with nonhead orthopedic trauma injuries 17 years and older seen in 11 US hospitals with level 1 trauma centers were included in this study. Main Outcomes and Measures: Probable PTSD (PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 score, ≥33) and MDD (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item score, ≥15) at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. Results: Participants were 1155 patients (752 men [65.1%]; mean [SD] age, 40.5 [17.2] years) with mTBI and 230 patients (155 men [67.4%]; mean [SD] age, 40.4 [15.6] years) with nonhead orthopedic trauma injuries. Weights-adjusted prevalence of PTSD and/or MDD in the mTBI vs orthopedic trauma comparison groups at 3 months was 20.0% (SE, 1.4%) vs 8.7% (SE, 2.2%) (P < .001) and at 6 months was 21.2% (SE, 1.5%) vs 12.1% (SE, 3.2%) (P = .03). Risk factors for probable PTSD at 6 months after mTBI included less education (adjusted odds ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97 per year), being black (adjusted odds ratio, 5.11; 95% CI, 2.89-9.05), self-reported psychiatric history (adjusted odds ratio, 3.57; 95% CI, 2.09-6.09), and injury resulting from assault or other violence (adjusted odds ratio, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.56-7.54). Risk factors for probable MDD after mTBI were similar with the exception that cause of injury was not associated with increased risk. Conclusions and Relevance: After mTBI, some individuals, on the basis of education, race/ethnicity, history of mental health problems, and cause of injury were at substantially increased risk of PTSD and/or MDD. These findings should influence recognition of at-risk individuals and inform efforts at surveillance, follow-up, and intervention.
Neural computations of threat in the aftermath of combat trauma
Research Article

Homan, P., Levy, I., Feltham, E., et al. (2019)
Nature Neuroscience (e-pub).

Abstract
By combining computational, morphological, and functional analyses, this study relates latent markers of associative threat learning to overt post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in combat veterans. Using reversal learning, we found that symptomatic veterans showed greater physiological adjustment to cues that did not predict what they had expected, indicating greater sensitivity to prediction errors for negative outcomes. This exaggerated weighting of prediction errors shapes the dynamic learning rate (associability) and value of threat predictive cues. The degree to which the striatum tracked the associability partially mediated the positive correlation between prediction-error weights and PTSD symptoms, suggesting that both increased prediction-error weights and decreased striatal tracking of associability independently contribute to PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, decreased neural tracking of value in the amygdala, in addition to smaller amygdala volume, independently corresponded to higher PTSD symptom severity. These results provide evidence for distinct neurocomputational contributions to PTSD symptoms.
Debunking Stereotypes Around Veterans and PTSD
Media Article

November 16th, 2018 | via New York Times

From shell-shock to PTSD, a century of invisible war trauma
Media Article

November 11th, 2018 | via PBS

I Was 12 When I Survived 9/11. Some of My Peers Are Only Now Realizing Their PTSD
Media Article

September 11th, 2018 | via Fortune Magazine

For military veterans suffering from PTSD, are service dogs good therapy?
Media Article

March 27th, 2018 | via The Washington Post